Coronavirus live news: Latin America and Caribbean exceed 2m cases as Brazil’s death toll passes 50,000

 

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Latin America and Caribbean exceed 2m cases – as it happened” was written by Clea Skopeliti (now) and Molly Blackall , Rebecca Ratcliffe (earlier), for theguardian.com on Sunday 21st June 2020 23.13 UTC

12.13am BST

We have now closed this blog, but you can stay up to date on all our live coverage of coronavirus on our new global blog below:

12.03am BST

Summary

That’s all from me for today – I’ll hand over to my colleague Helen Sullivan to guide you all through the next bit. As always, thanks for following along.

11.40pm BST

WHO registers record rise in global cases

The World Health Organization has reported a record increase in global coronavirus cases, rising by 183,020 in 24 hours, according to Reuters.

The biggest increase was from North and South America with over 116,000 new cases, according to a daily report. Total global cases have passed 8.7 million with more than 461,000 deaths, according to the WHO.

The previous record for new cases was 181,232 on 18 June.

11.23pm BST

AFP has this amazing story about an Argentine man who sailed across the Atlantic to see his ageing parents

“Mission accomplished!” That joyful declaration came from Juan Manuel Ballestero, an Argentine sailor who, unable to fly home from Portugal due to the pandemic, crossed the ocean alone in his modest sailboat to see his ageing parents.

“I did it! I did it! I did it!” Ballestero exclaimed at dockside last week when he reached his hometown of Mar del Plata.

The 47-year-old had completed an exhausting 85-day odyssey in his small boat, the nine-meter “Skua.”

After testing negative for Covid-19 on arrival, Ballestero was cleared to set foot on dry land to see his mother 82-year-old Nilda and father Carlos, aged 90.

“I’ve achieved what I’ve been fighting for these last three months,” he told AFP. “It came down to this: to be with the family. That’s why I came.”

He had hoped to arrive in Argentina by May 15, for his father’s 90th birthday. He missed that date, but instead was able to celebrate Father’s Day with his family.

Ballestero, who works in Spain, hatched his ambitious plan for a single-handed sea passage after flights back to Argentina were canceled because of the pandemic.

He learned during the long trip home that “people were dying every day, by the thousands,” a jarring realization at a time when he was “in the middle of nature, seeing how the world goes on.

“There were dolphins and whales… even as humanity was passing through this difficult moment.”

For 54 long days, his family had no word from him.

“But we knew he was going to come,” said a smiling Carlos. “We had no doubt. He was coming to Mar del Plata to be with his parents.”

The coronavirus has claimed 1,000 lives in Argentina, many of them elderly people like Carlos and his wife.

The younger Ballestero’s first stop on the 12,000-kilometer trip was at Vitoria, Brazil; the last one before arrival was in La Paloma, Uruguay.

The Skua now sits docked at the Mar del Plata nautical club, and probably won’t be leaving soon. Ballestero has no immediate travel plans.

Juan Manuel Ballestero stands on his boat in Mar del Plata, Argentina, Thursday, June 18, 2020. Ballestero crossed the Atlantic on a small sailboat, setting off from the port of Porto Santo in Portugal on March 24 and finally reaching Mar del Plata on Wednesday to be reunited with his parents after flights to Argentina were cut due to the COVID-19 lockdown. (AP Photo/Vicente Robles)
Juan Manuel Ballestero stands on his boat in Mar del Plata, Argentina, Thursday, June 18, 2020. Ballestero crossed the Atlantic on a small sailboat, setting off from the port of Porto Santo in Portugal on March 24 and finally reaching Mar del Plata on Wednesday to be reunited with his parents after flights to Argentina were cut due to the COVID-19 lockdown. (AP Photo/Vicente Robles)
Photograph: Vicente Robles/AP

Updated at 11.26pm BST

11.09pm BST

UK prime minister Boris Johnson will on Tuesday reveal his plan to reopen the hospitality sector from 4 July, and announce the result of the review of the two-metre social-distancing rule.

After consulting his cabinet on Monday and Tuesday, Johnson will outline the plans to parliament for pubs, restaurants, hotels and hairdressers. Guidance will be published for each sector on how businesses can reduce the spread of Covid-19 when they reopen.

The public are expected to be warned that the latest easing of rules will be the first to be reversed if there are widespread breaches that cause the number of infections to peak, with a No 10 spokesman adding: “We will not hesitate to put the handbrake on to stop the virus running out of control.”

Updated at 11.11pm BST

10.56pm BST

Mexico will resume sending temporary farmworkers to Canada after the two countries reached an agreement on improved safety protections for labourers on Canadian farms during the coronavirus pandemic, the Mexican government has said.

Mexico said last Tuesday it would pause sending workers to farms with coronavirus infections after at least two of its nationals died from Covid-19 after outbreaks on 17 Canadian farms, according to Reuters.

Canadian farmers rely on 60,000 short-term foreign workers, predominantly from Latin America and the Caribbean, to plant and harvest crops. Mexico’s foreign ministry said in a statement that the Temporary Agricultural Workers Program had “entered into operation once again after a temporary pause.”

The two nations “reached an agreement to improve the sanitary conditions of the nationals who work on farms,” the statement added.

Updated at 11.00pm BST

10.31pm BST

A further 83 coronavirus cases have been confirmed at a chicken processing plant in North Wales, health authorities said, bringing the total to 158.

Production was stopped at the 2 Sisters factory in Llangefni, Anglesey, on Thursday after the Covid-19 outbreak was declared and staff told to self-isolate for two weeks, according to the Press Association.

The latest group of cases were confirmed over the 24 hours to 3pm on Sunday. Public Health Wales had previously recorded 75 infections.

Dr Christopher Johnson, consultant in health protection at Public Health Wales, said: “Since we commenced targeted testing last Thursday, over 400 members of staff have provided samples so far. Testing of employees continues, and it is likely that some additional cases will be identified in the coming days.”

It comes amid concerns over how coronavirus outbreaks are announced, with another cluster at the Kober meat processing plant in Cleckheaton, West Yorkshire, confirmed by owner Asda on Friday.

On Thursday, the 2 Sisters Food Group announced it was “doing the right thing” and would cease work on site for 14 days with immediate effect.

The company said the first reported positive case at the plant was on 28 May, and a full “safe ways of working” action plan had been in place since early March. Production at the factory, where 560 people are employed, will be transferred to other company locations until 2 July.

Also on Thursday, in Wrexham, North Wales, 38 employees at the Rowan Foods factory tested positive for the coronavirus, though bosses said the cases were due to a local increase in the area rather than a spread within the site.

2 Sisters Food Group is one of the largest food producers in the UK.

10.13pm BST

Spot a story you think I’ve missed? You can reach me on Twitter @cleaskopeliti or by email.

9.39pm BST

We’ve had an update on the anti-lockdown protest in The Hague, where Dutch police have now said some 400 people were arrested after they refused to disperse, AFP reports.

“We have arrested some 400 people today. A large number of them have been since let go,” the police said on Twitter.

Reuters had previously reported that around 100 people had been arrested, based on media reports and witness accounts, as the police had not announced a figure.

Dutch police arrested dozens of people on June 21, 2020, after skirmishes broke out at an coronavirus protest in The Hague, with law officers carrying out horseback charges and using a water cannon. (Photo by ROBIN VAN LONKHUIJSEN/ANP/AFP via Getty Images)
Dutch police arrested dozens of people on June 21, 2020, after skirmishes broke out at an coronavirus protest in The Hague, with law officers carrying out horseback charges and using a water cannon. (Photo by ROBIN VAN LONKHUIJSEN/ANP/AFP via Getty Images)
Photograph: Robin van Lonkhuijsen/ANP/AFP/Getty Images

The Hague Mayor Johan Remkes said the demonstration was banned because authorities had information that “troublemakers” from all over the Netherlands, including groups of known football hooligans, were planning to descend on The Hague.

“This has nothing to do with protesting or the right to freedom of speech. This group was deliberately trying to disturb public order,” Remkes said in a statement.

Updated at 9.52pm BST

9.06pm BST

The coronavirus has been spreading faster in the last 10 days in French Guyana and the French government is not ruling out imposing a new lockdown on the French overseas territory, the prime minister’s office has said in a statement.

Prime minister Edouard Philippe’s office also said in the statement that the government would be increasing its resources to tackle the outbreak in the region, Reuters reports.

9.01pm BST

Summary

For those of you just joining the blog, here’s a round up of the key developments from the last few hours.

Updated at 10.56pm BST

8.13pm BST

The number of coronavirus deaths in France has risen by seven from the previous day to 29,640, the country’s national health service has said.

The number of confirmed cases rose by 284 to 160,377.

France has the fifth-highest coronavirus death toll in the world, although the rate of casualties has dropped sharply over the last two months, allowing the country to gradually reopen its economy.

8.10pm BST

Morocco will resume domestic flights from 25 June, the state news agency has announced.

The government had said earlier today that it would further relax lockdown measures for the services sector and domestic transport starting 24 June, adding domestic travel would resume including flights and railways.

7.32pm BST

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has reported a further 32,411 coronavirus cases, bringing the total to 2,248,029.

The number of deaths has risen by 560 to 119,615.

The CDC figures do not necessarily reflect cases reported by individual states.

7.15pm BST

Dubai has said it will allow foreign visitors to enter from 7 July, while those with residency visas can enter the country from Monday.

Citizens and residents would be allowed to travel abroad from 23 June.

Those entering would have to present certificates to show they had recently tested negative for the coronavirus or would undergo tests on arrival at Dubai airports, the Dubai media office has said in a statement.

“The new announcement will allow thousands of people affected by the worldwide restrictions in passenger air traffic since the start of the pandemic to resume their travel plans,” it added.

7.04pm BST

Apple has responded to UK health secretary Matt Hancock’s earlier attacks on the company’s “intransigence”, which earned a rare rebuke from the typically taciturn technology corporation.

Blaming Apple for the delay to the government’s contact tracing app, which was supposed to launch at the end of May and has now been delayed until at least September, Hancock said: “Of course I wish we had brought it in sooner, I wish that Apple had made the change for it to work in Apple phones in the same way that the original works on Android phones, but we will get there.”

In response, an Apple spokesperson told the Guardian: “Apple is committed to working with the UK government to help tackle Covid-19. We’ve been constant collaborators with NHSX and will continue working with them on ways to further optimise the technology while protecting our customers’ privacy. Many countries have successfully launched Exposure Notification apps and we look forward to helping the UK government do the same.”

On Friday, the Guardian reported that Apple and Google had been taken by surprise by Hancock’s live public claim that the two companies would work with the government on a “hybrid” contact tracing app, which would apparently incorporate elements from both systems into one new app.

Updated at 7.06pm BST

6.25pm BST

Germany’s coronavirus reproduction rate spikes

The coronavirus reproduction rate in Germany jumped to 2.88 on Sunday, up from 1.79 a day earlier, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for public health said.

This increase brings infections over the level needed to contain the rate over the long term, Reuters reports.

A reproduction rate, or ‘R’, of 2.88 means that out of 100 people who contracted the virus, a further 288 other people will get infected. A rate of less than one is needed to gradually contain the disease.

The number represents a sharp increase from 1.06 on Friday, and is based on RKI’s moving 4-day average data, which reflects infection rates one to two weeks ago.

RKI said outbreaks have been reported in nursing homes and hospitals, institutions for asylum seekers and refugees, in meat processing plants and logistics companies, among seasonal harvest workers and in connection with religious events and family gatherings.

Here’s an explainer on the R number:

Updated at 6.27pm BST

5.57pm BST

Summary

5.31pm BST

Police in The Hague arrested some 100 people on Sunday after they refused to leave a protest against the Dutch government’s social distancing measures, Reuters reports.

About a thousand protesters had gathered in the Malieveld area in The Hague, despite though the demonstration have been banned by the municipality.

“The remaining demonstrators on the Malieveld who refused to leave have all been arrested,” the police tweeted.

Dutch media said about 100 people were arrested. A witness gave a similar estimate.

The authorities had allowed a brief protest to proceed before asking demonstrators to disperse. Police made the arrests when a group of about 200 people refused to leave, according to the witness.

5.12pm BST

Several police officers were injured in clashes with residents of an apartment complex in the German city of Goettingen who had been put under quarantine following a coronavirus outbreak, authorities have said.

The violence broke out on Saturday as a group of residents sought to break through a metal barrier erected to keep the 700 people living in the residential complex inside to stop the spread of the virus.

Residents were placed under quarantine on Thursday after two tested positive. By Friday, 120 people in the building had tested positive.

Residents of the quarantined high-rise building are standing up and pursuing a police operation in Goettingen, Germany, Saturday, June 20, 2020. On Saturday the city wanted to carry out retesting of residents of the building complex. (Stefan Rampfel/dpa via AP)
Residents of the quarantined high-rise building are standing up and pursuing a police operation in Goettingen, Germany, Saturday, June 20, 2020. On Saturday the city wanted to carry out retesting of residents of the building complex. (Stefan Rampfel/dpa via AP)
Photograph: Stefan Rampfel/AP
Residents of the quarantined high-rise building are standing on windowsills and pursuing a police operation in Goettingen, Germany, Saturday, June 20, 2020. (Stefan Rampfel/dpa via AP)
Residents of the quarantined high-rise building are standing on windowsills and pursuing a police operation in Goettingen, Germany, Saturday, June 20, 2020. (Stefan Rampfel/dpa via AP)
Photograph: Stefan Rampfel/AP

Updated at 5.14pm BST

4.23pm BST

The United Nations has accused the Taliban and Afghan security forces of “deliberate” attacks against healthcare workers and facilities at a time when Afghanistan is grappling with the coronavirus epidemic.

The United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (Unama) said it had registered 12 such acts of violence between 11 March and 23 May against healthcare facilities and workers.

Unama attributed eight of the attacks to the Taliban and three to Afghan forces, AFP reports.

One attack, an assault on a Kabul maternity hospital on 12 May, still remained unclaimed. The assault killed 25 people, including 16 mothers, according to international charity Doctors Without Borders .

“At a time when an urgent humanitarian response was required to protect every life in Afghanistan, both the Taliban and Afghan national security forces carried out deliberate acts of violence that undermined healthcare operations,” the head of Unama, Deborah Lyons, said in a statement.

Updated at 4.26pm BST

4.04pm BST

Hello, I’m Clea Skopeliti and I’ll be taking you through the next few hours. If you’ve got a news tip or story from your part of the world, please do get in touch with me by Twitter DM or email. Cheers!

3.47pm BST

Cases exceed 2m in Latin America and Caribbean

Latin America and the Caribbean have surpassed 2 million cases, according to an AFP tally based on official figures.

Brazil is home to more than half of the infections. The virus is accelerating its spread in the region, with Mexico the second hardest-hit country there, followed by Peru and Chile.

Updated at 3.54pm BST

3.14pm BST

Meanwhile Cyprus, the only country to say it will cover costs if travellers are diagnosed with Covid-19, has also relaxed restrictions on visitors.

The EU’s most easterly state announced that while spot tests will be conducted on arrivals, the majority will no longer be required to obtain negative coronavirus certificates 72 hours prior to heading to the island. Under the scheme, up to 15% of the estimated 1,500 passengers expected in the coming weeks to fly in daily will be randomly checked.

“The only thing they need to do to fly here is fill in an electronic form,” said deputy tourism minister Savvas Perdios adding that there was a growing sense among tour operators that some of the summer could be saved.

Like most Mediterranean nations, Cyprus is dependent on tourism and, as in Greece, is now forced to weigh allowing people in while avoiding virus outbreaks that could besmirch its record as a safe destination. The two nations had among the lowest infection and casualty rates in Europe.

But Perdios told the Guardian it would be a few weeks, yet, before the former colony resumed flights from Britain – with 1.3 million visitors its main market.

“The situation in the UK is improving all the time,” he said in a telephone interview from Nicosia, the island’s war-divided island. “The general consensus is in a few weeks from now flights will be possible … mid July, around the 15th, is a reasonable expectation, earlier than that not really.”

If permitted, passengers from the UK would still very likely have to carry immunity certificates or be subject to coronavirus tests upon arrival.

With Britons accounting for 30% of the island’s vital tourist sector, officials expect losses of around 70% compared to earnings last year. But for travellers it wasn’t all bad.

Perdios foresaw “very good deals” in the months ahead following talks with tour operators.

“Now that things are a little bit clearer and destinations are opening, tour operators feel that it’s possible to save a small part of the summer even at the last moment,” he said.

“I think now the wheel is turning, things are being put in motion and there are going to be very good deals, I am certain of that not only in Cyprus but [across] the Mediterranean. Rates, deals and packages are being finalised as we speak.”

The island’s airports began accepting commercial flights on 9 June, three months after suspending air links as efforts were stepped up to stem the spread of the highly contagious disease. As yet there had been no cases of foreign travellers testing positive for Covid-19, Perdios said.

Updated at 3.54pm BST

3.01pm BST

UK official death toll rises by 43

The coronavirus death toll in the UK has risen by 43 to 42,632 as of 5pm on Saturday, figures from the Department of Health and Social Care show.

In total, 304,331 people have tested positive. There have been 7,890,145 tests, with 175,018 of those taking place on 20 June.

Updated at 3.03pm BST

2.53pm BST

Saudi Arabia has today lifted its nationwide curfew which was imposed to limit the spread of coronavirus in March.

Saudi authorities have said that all economic and commercial activities will return to normal, but the current bans on international travel and religious pilgrimage will remain in place.

Some measures have already been relaxed, and tens of thousands of mosques opened last month.

However, the country is yet to comment on Hajj pilgrimage, which normally sees 2.5 million pilgrims travel to the city of Mecca, and is due to take place next month.

Countries including Malaysia and Indonesia have said they will not be allowing their nationals to attend.

Updated at 2.54pm BST

2.41pm BST

Scotland: No new coronavirus deaths

There have been no new deaths of coronavirus patients in Scotland for the fifth day this month, according to the latest Scottish government figures.

A total of 2,472 patients in Scotland have died after testing positive for Covid-19, which shows no change since Saturday’s figures.

The Scottish Government’s daily update on coronavirus figures shows that 18,156 people have tested positive for the virus in Scotland, an increase of 26 from 18,130 the previous day. Of those who have tested positive, 518 were in hospital on Saturday night.

A total of 16 patients were in intensive care with either confirmed or suspected Covid-19, a rise of two in 24 hours.

However, it is important to note that weekend reporting figures are often lower than weekdays due to a lag in reporting.

Members of the public and railway staff wear face masks in Waverley Station on June 18, 2020 in Edinburgh, Scotland. First Minister Nicola Sturgeon announced phase 2 of lifting coronavirus restrictions, as of Monday it will be mandatory to wear face masks on all public transport, including taxis and private hire cars.
Members of the public and railway staff wear face masks in Waverley Station on June 18, 2020 in Edinburgh, Scotland. First Minister Nicola Sturgeon announced phase 2 of lifting coronavirus restrictions, as of Monday it will be mandatory to wear face masks on all public transport, including taxis and private hire cars.
Photograph: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Scotland is preparing to ease some lockdown measures on Monday, including reopening places of worship for private prayer with increased hygiene measures and social distancing.

Face coverings will also be made mandatory from Monday, with Scotland’s national railway ScotRail providing free masks at 18 of its busiest stations.

Updated at 2.55pm BST

2.27pm BST

Iran reports more than 100 new deaths for third day running

Iran has reported more than 100 new coronavirus deaths on Sunday for the third day running, health authorities said.

They stressed that the outbreak had not yet peaked in the country, which has seen the deadliest outbreak in the Middle East.

The country recorded its lowest single-day death toll in early May, before seeing a new rise in cases in recent weeks.

Health ministry spokeswoman Sima Sadat Lari said the 116 deaths reported on Sunday brought the country’s overall coronavirus death toll to 9,623. However, the health minister Said Namaki denied that the country was facing a second wave, saying that the peak had not yet passed.

“Even in provinces where we think the first coronavirus wave is behind us, we have not yet fully experienced the first wave,” he was quoted as saying by semi-official news agency ISNA.

Authorities recorded 2,368 new infections on Sunday, bringing the total number of confirmed cases of the virus to 204,952.

Updated at 2.28pm BST

2.23pm BST

Pepsi was ordered to shut down one of its snack-making plants in Beijing after several employees tested positive for coronavirus and 87 close contacts were traced and quarantined.

It comes after 22 new cases were recorded in Beijing – the latest in a recent outbreak of coronavirus in the Chinese capital. More than 220 people have so far tested positive in this “second wave”, which is thought to have broken out in at the city’s Xinfadi wholesale market.

AFP news agency reports that the origins of the virus have been traced to the chopping boards used to handle imported salmon at the market. The market, which supplies more than 70% of Beijing’s fresh produce, has been closed.

People wear face masks to help curb the spread of  coronavirus as they observe the partial solar eclipse at Olympic park on June 21, 2020 in Beijing, China.
People wear face masks to help curb the spread of coronavirus as they observe the partial solar eclipse at Olympic park on June 21, 2020 in Beijing, China.
Photograph: Lintao Zhang/Getty Images

Pepsi is not the only company to be impacted by Beijing’s recent outbreak. China has also suspended poultry imports from a plant owned by American meat processor company Tyson Inc, after the company confirmed that coronavirus had been detected at its plant in Springdale in Arizona.

On Friday, officials announced a nationwide campaign to inspect all fresh products coming from “high-risk countries” following reports of new virus clusters at plants in Germany and the US.

Updated at 3.15pm BST

1.57pm BST

A drive-in church service has taken place in Cornwall, UK.

Dozens of people arrived at a car park in Cornwall to sing and pray together, in a service organised by Reverend Matt Timms of Wave House church. Local council and police were supportive, Timms said, and people remained in their cars to ensure social distancing.

Places of worship remain closed for mass gatherings in the UK.

Timms said it was wonderful to hear people singing together and seeing one another after so long apart. He said during lockdown, people had been “craving community”, and he was delighted to “share a message of hope”.

I will try to find some photographs for you all!

Updated at 3.13pm BST

1.32pm BST

Summary

  • Taiwan will allow business trips from foreign visitors, but only those from ‘low-risk’ countries, and subject to conditions.
  • Morocco has opened a field hospital after a spike in Covid-19 cases.
  • In the UK, the health secretary Matt Hancock has said that the country is on track for the further easing of restrictions on 4 July. This is likely to include some changes to the 2m social distancing rules to enable businesses to open. He also apologised after a video surfaced of him momentarily breaching social distancing rules.
  • The former Bangladesh cricket captain Mashrafe Mortaza has tested positive for coronavirus, along with two other players.

Updated at 3.12pm BST

1.14pm BST

The UK government has said it will change the law to enable greater scrutiny of certain foreign takeovers to ensure that they do not impinge on the country’s response to public health emergencies.

The changes, which will be introduced to the Enterprise Act on Monday, will allow the government to step in if a business involved in a pandemic response becomes the target of a takeover.

The business secretary, Alok Sharma, said: “These powers will send an important signal to those seeking to take advantage of those struggling as a result of the pandemic that the UK government is prepared to act where necessary to protect our national security.”

Updated at 3.11pm BST

1.06pm BST

Two further areas of Beijing have increased their coronavirus risk level to high following a recent outbreak in the city, Chinese state media is reporting.

This means there are four high-risk areas, and 37 medium risk areas in the city.

More than 200 people have been infected with the virus in recent weeks, in an outbreak thought to have originated at a wholesale market in the city.

Updated at 2.49pm BST

12.58pm BST

The Pope has said that the dramatic reduction in pollution during lockdown should trigger greater environment awareness as the measures are lifted.

At his Sunday address in St. Peter’s Square, Francis said the pandemic made many people reflect on their relationship with the environment.

“The lockdown has reduced pollution and revealed once more the beauty of so many places free from traffic and noise. Now, with the resumption of activities, we should all be more responsible for looking after our common home,” he said – using his phrase for the planet.

Nuns wearing a face mask, some holding Poland’s national flag (R) attend the Pope’s weekly Angelus prayer at St. Peter’s square in the Vatican on 21 June.
Nuns wearing a face mask, some holding Poland’s national flag (R) attend the Pope’s weekly Angelus prayer at St. Peter’s square in the Vatican on 21 June.
Photograph: Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images

The Roman Catholic Church is currently marking the fifth anniversary of Francis’ landmark encyclical “Laudato Si” (Praised Be) on the need to protect the environment.

The Vatican released a 225 page manual on Thursday in which is said that Catholics should disinvest from fossil fuel industries and closely monitor companies in sectors such as mining to prevent environmental damage.

Pollution has dropped all over the world, with many locations seeing wild animals reclaiming urban areas, and Venice’s dark canals running clear enough to see fish in the water.

Many cities have used the lockdown to introduce greater pedestrian areas and cycle routes.

12.49pm BST

Spain ended its state of emergency at midnight on Saturday, ending its travel restrictions on visitors from the EU, the Schengen zone countries, and the UK.

All passengers will have their temperature taken at the airport on arrival, submit information on whether they have had the virus, and provide contact details including where they are staying.

UK visitors will not have to quarantine on arrival.

The Spanish foreign minister said the country was “doing this out respect for the 400,000 British citizens who have a second residence in Spain and are dying to benefit from their homes in our country”.

You can get more information from my colleague Sam Jones in Madrid:

Updated at 3.09pm BST

12.30pm BST

The first minister of Wales has said the Welsh government is keen to bring the “stay local” coronavirus message to an end in two weeks’ time, but emphasised that it remained in place for now.

The Welsh government is hopeful people will be able to travel across Wales, rather than simply in their local area, in a fortnight’s time.

First minister Mark Drakeford warned this would mean communities who have not had many visitors would have to prepare to welcome people safely, with amenities such as car parks and public toilets needing to be reopened. He emphasised that ensuring this happened safely would take time, so the “stay local” message remained in place for now.

He reminded people that “coronavirus was not over”.

“Two more weeks, one last lap, we can do this together. Then provided everything remains as we hope it will, we will be able to make that part of the coronavirus crisis something behind us,” he said.

Updated at 3.04pm BST

12.21pm BST

Fiat Chrysler has agreed to the conditions necessary to receive a state-backed €6.3bn loan from Italy.

This means the company will not relocate or cut jobs, which will provide significant relief to the 55,000 people employed by Fiat Chrysler in Italy.

The company will also commit to investing €5.2bn in Italy on new and existing projects, and up to €1.2bn on its 1,400 or so foreign suppliers, said Sole 24 Ore, Italy’s financial newspaper.

The request for state support on such a large loan has proved controversial, particularly with the company’s corporate headquarters in Amsterdam, and the guarantee is yet to be signed off by the economy ministry.

Updated at 3.03pm BST

12.13pm BST

Soybean companies in China have hit back against claims that the second outbreak of coronavirus ongoing in Beijing originated in the soybean section of a wholesale market in the city.

The Soybean Products Committee of China National Food Industry association said there has been no coronavirus contamination in soybean companies, Chinese state media platform Global Times is reporting.

Updated at 3.03pm BST

11.38am BST

More than 2 million people in Beijing have been tested for coronavirus in the past two weeks, Chinese state media Global Times is reporting.

It comes after a new wave of the virus broke out in the city, thought to have originated at a wholesale food market. More than 200 people have been infected in Beijing between 11-20 June, and state media said the “majority [were] related to Xinfadi market in Beijing’s Fengtai district”.

The report said that following the tests many were asked to quarantine at home, though it does not give any figures.

Beijing raised the emergency response to level 2 on 16 June. Schools were suspended and some employees have been told to work from home.

On Saturday, a team of 70 medical staff from the Hubei province arrived in Beijing by high-speed train to support the city in dealing with its new outbreak.

People wearing face masks to protect against coronavirus take photos of a partial solar eclipse near the Forbidden City in Beijing on Sunday.
People wearing face masks to protect against coronavirus take photos of a partial solar eclipse near the Forbidden City in Beijing on Sunday.
Photograph: Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Updated at 3.00pm BST

11.30am BST

Thanks to all those who are getting in touch with tips and pointers, it’s much appreciated.

If you spot something that we should be reporting on in this blog, you can drop me a message on Twitter. I won’t always be able to reply but will give it my best shot. Thanks in advance!

Updated at 11.30am BST

11.26am BST

British health secretary apologises for momentarily breaking social distancing restrictions

The British health secretary apologised this morning after a video emerged of him breaking physical distancing rules in the House of Commons last week.

The video showed him approaching a colleague and patting him on the back, and then stepping over to talk to another, before appearing to realise his breach of restrictions and stepping back.

Hancock told the Andrew Marr Show on the BBC: “It was just totally natural. This shows how difficult social distancing is. I know these rules inside out and I haven’t seen my colleague for weeks and I really like him.”

“All I can do is say I’m incredibly sorry for this momentary breach,” he said. “It’s because I’m human, we’re all human and I’m not less determined to follow the rules because of a momentary breach.”

Updated at 2.59pm BST

11.22am BST

China has suspended poultry imports from a plant owned by American meat processor company Tyson Inc, after the company confirmed that coronavirus had been detected at its plant in Springdale in Arizona.

China also suspended pork products from German pork processor Toennies last week following a coronavirus outbreak among hundreds of its workers.

Updated at 11.49am BST

11.14am BST

Cyprus has today begun to reopen crossing points between the Turkish and Greek Cypriot sides after being shut for more than three months due to the coronavirus pandemic.

However, the two sides have different sets of regulations in place.

Cyprus’s internationally recognised government, which in effect controls only the south of the island, said it would only allow those who can produce a negative test for coronavirus to cross. Turkish Cypriot authorities also made the tests a requirement, and said only certain groups of individuals could cross.

However, the tests cost money, which one Cypriot peace activist, Andreas Paralikis, said would put people off.

A Turkish Cypriot man wearing a face mask is seen at the Ayios Dhometios checkpoint in Nicosia.
A Turkish Cypriot man wearing a face mask is seen at the Ayios Dhometios checkpoint in Nicosia.
Photograph: Yiannis Kourtoglou/Reuters

Updated at 11.15am BST

11.10am BST

Brazil’s death toll passes 50,000

Brazil’s Covid-19 death toll has risen above 50,000, according to a coalition of Brazilian news outlets that is tracking the pandemic.

Another 964 deaths were recorded on Saturday taking the South American country’s total number of fatalities to 50,058. The actual figure is believed to be considerably higher.

Brazil, which is now the world’s second-worst hit country after the US, has also confirmed 1.07m Covid-19 cases – 30,972 on Saturday alone. Experts say low testing say the true figure could be seven times higher.

The rising death toll has sparked an outcry against Brazil’s far-right leader, Jair Bolsonaro, who continues to play down the coronavirus as a “bit of a cold” and is urging Brazil to get back to work, against expert advice.

On Saturday Brazil’s most-watched nightly news show, Jornal Nacional, issued a thinly-veiled but stark warning to Bolsonaro over his actions.

“History will remember the valuable work of all those who did everything in their power to fight this pandemic – the health professionals above all,” said Renata Vasconcellos, one of its presenters.

Her co-host, William Bonner, then added: “But history will also record those who stood by, who were remiss, those who were disrespectful. History ascribes dishonour just as it ascribes glory – and history lasts forever”.

Updated at 2.59pm BST

10.51am BST

Hancock: UK on track for further easing of restrictions, to be announced this week

The British government will announce plans to further ease the coronavirus lockdown this week, health minister Matt Hancock has said. This will potentially include the relaxation of the 2m social distancing rules, allowing businesses to reopen in early July.

“We’re about to see another step in the plan,” Hancock said an interview with the BBC. “This week we will announce further details of the measures we can take to relieve some of the national lockdown measures at the start of July, including on July 4.”

Many employers, especially in the hospitality and leisure sectors, have said the rule that people must remain two metres apart will prevent them from being able to operate as lockdown measures are lifted.

Asked if the two-metre rule would be amended in the plans to be announced this week, he said: “I very much hope that we can.”

He said perspex screens and masks are some measures which would mitigate the risk of spreading coronavirus if the two-metre rule is changed, and that the government would would set out details about how businesses could comply.

He also discussed regulations for pubs to reopen, saying he “wouldn’t rule out” pre-registration or the use of apps for ordering.

Earlier, on Sky News’ Sophy Ridge programme, Hancock said the country was “clearly on track for that plan because [of] the number of cases coming down, and the plan does refer to hospitality and some of the other things that are closed that so many people want to see open.”

Acknowledging that “a lot of the country does need a haircut”, he said that he is “not going to rule out” hairdressers and barbers also being able to reopen on 4 July.

Updated at 2.57pm BST

10.38am BST

Taiwan to allow limited business visits from foreign visitors

Taiwan will allow residents from 11 countries or regions to enter for short-term business visits from 11 June, a state-owned news agency is reporting.

Each visitor will need to prove they do not have coronavirus three days before flying to Taiwan, and need to quarantine themselves on arrival. However, this is only for five to seven days, and people can self monitor after that.

They will also need to prove that the purpose of their trip is business, and must not have travelled to any other region for 14 days prior to the flight.

They must only be in Taiwan for three months, and the easing of restrictions will, for now, apply to countries deemed to have low and medium infection risk.

These include New Zealand, Australia, Macau, Palau, Fiji, Brunei, Vietnam, Hong Kong, Thailand, Mongolia, Bhutan, South Korea, Japan, Malaysia and Singapore.

Updated at 2.56pm BST

10.28am BST

The former Bangladesh cricket captain and two other players revealed they have tested positive for coronavirus.

Mashrafe Mortaza, who stepped down as the one-day international captain in March but remains available for selection, is also a member of parliament, and has been actively supporting people in Bangladesh during the pandemic.

His mother-in-law and another relative tested positive last week, a Narail health official said.

Mashrafe Bin Mortaza (Top) is lifted by his teammate Tamim Iqbal (R) after the third one day international (ODI) cricket match between Bangladesh and Zimbabwe at the International Cricket Stadium in Sylhet on March 6, 2020, shortly before he stepped down as captain.
Mashrafe Bin Mortaza (Top) is lifted by his teammate Tamim Iqbal (R) after the third one day international (ODI) cricket match between Bangladesh and Zimbabwe at the International Cricket Stadium in Sylhet on March 6, 2020, shortly before he stepped down as captain.
Photograph: AFP via Getty Images

Left-arm spinner Nazmul Islam has also been taking part in virus aid work in his hometown of Narayanganj.

“I don’t know how I got it. My parents also tested positive along with me,” he told AFP Sunday.

Former opener Nafees Iqbal, the elder brother of Bangladesh opener Tamim Iqbal, also tested positive, breaking the news in an audio message emailed to reporters on Saturday.

“Ten days ago I was feeling feverish. For two days my body temperature was high. I lost my appetite, felt very weak,” he said.

“Then I gave sample for the test and the result came that I am Covid-19 positive.”

Bangladesh has recorded more than 108,000 cases of coronavirus, and more than 1,400 deaths.

Updated at 2.53pm BST

10.19am BST

Saudi Arabia is set to launch a tourism development fund with an initial capital investment of billion, the ministry of tourism has said.

The fund will work with private and investment banks to develop the sector.

It is not yet clear whether this comes is directly linked to the coronavirus pandemic, which has caused tourist industries around the world to shut down as travel restrictions ground would-be travellers.

According to the Johns Hopkins University Tracker, Saudi Arabia has had 154,233 confirmed cases of coronavirus, and 1,230 deaths.

10.10am BST

The number of daily infections of coronavirus is dropping in Afghanistan, the health ministry said, as it recorded 409 new infections.

This takes the total number of confirmed cases to 28,833. The death toll also rose by 11, to a total of 581 fatalities.

The country, which has admitted it has a lack of testing capacity, has tested 64,958 suspected patients since the outbreak began. There have been 8,764 recoveries and 19 patients are in critical condition.

In a press conference on Sunday in Kabul, Ahmad Jawad Osmani, the country’s acting health minister, said: “The number of daily infections is dropping and if people cooperate, we can control the spread of the virus.”

The health ministry has previously said it was unable to increase testing for coronavirus due to a lack of laboratories and an overload of suspected patients, and said medical workers would determine new coronavirus patients through their symptoms, rather than through tests.

Afghan enthusiasts perform yoga to mark International Yoga Day during the Covid-19 pandemic lockdown, on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan.
Afghan enthusiasts perform yoga to mark International Yoga Day during the Covid-19 pandemic lockdown, on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan.
Photograph: Rahmat Gul/AP

The Covid-19 testing laboratory in western province of Herat resumed work on Saturday after a week-long pause due to lack of kits. The province’s laboratory is responsible for testing samples of patients in Herat and nearby areas. The province has recorded 38 new cases in the last 24 hours.

Herat borders Iran – which has been badly hit by the pandemic – and the first case of the virus was reported in the province after thousands of Afghan migrants returned from the neighbouring country in February and March, fanning out across the country without being tested or quarantined.

The capital, Kabul, which has been the country’s worst affected area, still leads new daily infections as most new cases (184) have been reported in the capital. Kabul has so far recorded 11,927 cases and 133 deaths.

The central province of Ghazni has recorded its worst day of the crisis after seven patients died in the province last night and 11 new cases confirmed from 15 tests. The remote province of Zabul where its only hospital was destroyed in a Taliban attack last year, recorded one death and 7 new cases from 8 tests.

Updated at 11.06am BST

10.05am BST

The head of the Office for National Statistics, the UK government’s statistic department, has said the country is entering “a new phase” of Covid-19.

Sir Ian Diamond told the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show: “I think we are moving into a new phase. The virus certainly hasn’t gone away and we need to move into a period of surveillance and real vigilance to identify any outbreaks and move to get on top of them really, really quickly.”

Diamond also said current data suggests that around 3.5 million people in the UK have either had coronavirus or have natural antibodies to it. There are around 3,000 new infections daily in the UK.

Diamond said the ONS is conducting of its largest ever surveys to monitor the number of cases as the lockdown restrictions are lifted.

“My own belief is that this virus is going to be with us for a very long time and we are going to have to be absolutely vigilant to check we are on top of the outbreaks which will come,” he said.

Updated at 10.12am BST

9.54am BST

Indonesia reports 862 new infections and 36 deaths

Indonesia has reported 862 new coronavirus infections and 36 new deaths, a health ministry official has said.

This takes the total number of cases to 45,891, Reuters reports, and increases the number of fatalities to 2,465.

This is the highest coronavirus death toll in East Asia, outside of China.

Updated at 10.54am BST

9.51am BST

Morocco opens field hospital after spike in Covid-19 cases

Morocco has opened a field hospital after a spike in coronavirus cases.

The new hospital, in eastern Morocco, will receive around 700 patients from Sunday.

The country reported more than 500 cases on Friday, mainly in Kenitra, having recorded on average fewer than 100 new coronavirus infections daily since it confirmed his first case in March.

Authorities in Morocco closed facilities, tested workers and launched an investigation to “establish responsibility” for the outbreak, Interior Minister Abdelouafi Laftit said, official news agency MAP report.

A member of the medical staff walks around during his break in the town of Moulay Bousselham, north of the capital Rabat, on June 20, 2020, as authorities received around 700 COVID-19 patients.
A member of the medical staff walks around during his break in the town of Moulay Bousselham, north of the capital Rabat, on June 20, 2020, as authorities received around 700 COVID-19 patients.
Photograph: Fadel Senna/AFP/Getty Images

Morocco, with a population of 34 million, has reported just over 9,800 cases and 213 deaths from the novel coronavirus.

Gatherings are prohibited and mosques, cinemas and theatres are closed, while restaurants and cafes are open but limited to take-away orders. Face masks are mandatory in public spaces, and the country’s borders are closed “until further notice”.

Updated at 10.05am BST

9.29am BST

British health secretary Matt Hancock has said that Apple wouldn’t make a change to enable the government’s coronavirus app and described them as “intransigent” in the past – appearing to blame the tech giant for the delay.

He told Sky’s Sophy Ridge On Sunday: “There were clearly problems with ours because it worked on Android, and Apple wouldn’t make the change to allow it to work on Apple.”

“Of course I wish we had brought it in sooner, I wish that Apple had made the change for it to work in Apple phones in the same way that the original works on Android phones, but we will get there,” Hancock said.

He added: “The moment that Apple and Google brought forward their technology we started working on that as well, so absolutely it’s perfectly a reasonable point that people make that Apple have in the past also been intransigent in the face of perfectly reasonable requests from democratically elected governments to work with them on solving particular problems, whether that’s about solutions to terrorism or other technical problems.”

“And so absolutely I understand that reluctance on their part and to be fair to Apple they may have good technical reasons for it which are under the skin of things.”

Hancock also would not put a date on the launch of the tracing app. He said he was “highly confident” that the app would be built.

“We don’t have a launch date and until we do I’m just going to work hard to get it as soon as possible,” he said.

9.24am BST

Russia records 7,728 new cases and 109 further deaths

Russia has reported 7,728 new cases of coronavirus, raising the total number of cases in the country to 584,680.

A further 109 people have died in the last 24 hours, bringing the total official death toll to 8,111, according to the national coronavirus response centre.

Updated at 10.55am BST

9.22am BST

Britons may have to register before going to the pub when lockdown is eased, health secretary Matt Hancock has said.

Asked on Sky News about measures reopen, Hancock said: “That’s the sort of thing we’re looking at for how do you make it safe to open things. And things like wearing a face mask which reduces the transmission clearly, about how the seating is arranged because face-to-face is much more dangerous than back-to-back and there’s more transmission than side to side.”

Pressed on registering before a pub, he said: “I wouldn’t rule that it out, it isn’t a decision we’ve taken yet, but there are other countries in the world that take that approach.”

9.16am BST

Ukranian death toll passes 1,000

The number of deaths linked to coronavirus in Ukraine has passed 1,000, the government website says.

The country has had 36,560 confirmed cases of coronavirus, with the death toll currently at 1,002.

Updated at 10.19am BST

8.55am BST

A national campaign may be needed to teach people in England to wear face masks correctly, a member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies’ (Sage) subgroup has said.

Prof Susan Michie said that many people using public transport in England are not wearing their face masks in the right way, and training may be needed to ensure they are used effectively.

Face coverings, which have been mandatory on public transport in England since 14 June, “should cover your mouth and nose while allowing you to breathe comfortably” according to the government website. It also stresses that you should not touch the front part of the mask, or the section which has been in contact with your nose and mouth.

Shoppers on Regent Street, in London, as further restrictions are lifted to bring England out of the coronavirus lockdown.
Shoppers on Regent Street, in London, as further restrictions are lifted to bring England out of the coronavirus lockdown.
Photograph: Dominic Lipinski/PA

However, Michie told the Sunday Telegraph many people appear to be wearing their face coverings below the nose and holding the front of items to remove them, rather than using the straps behind the head.

“I think the main thing is that where you have a behaviour that requires some kind of skill, and some kind of routine and procedure to make it effective, then usually it’s not enough to say do this, ie transmit knowledge, but we also need to have training,” she told the Telegraph.

“If it’s a question of skills, ie the behaviour surrounding the putting on, off and wearing of (face coverings), then it does require skills training.”

Updated at 9.06am BST

8.30am BST

Tokyo has confirmed 35 new cases of coronavirus.

According to the Johns Hopkins University tracker, Japan has had 17,725 cases of the virus, and 955 deaths.

Japan has been widely praised for its handling of coronavirus – you can read more about the country’s approach to the virus here, and in this article from the director of the Department of Health Crisis Management at Japan’s National Institute of Public Health.

Updated at 11.06am BST

8.22am BST

Hi everyone, I’m Molly Blackall, taking over the blog from my colleague Rebecca for the next few hours.

If you spot something you think we should be reporting on in this blog, you’re welcome to drop me a message on Twitter. I won’t be able to reply to everything, but I’ll endeavour to read it all. Thanks in advance!

8.15am BST

When Spain’s 13-week coronavirus state of emergency finishes today, it will bring an end to one of the most fraught, frustrating and claustrophobic chapters in the country’s recent history – and nowhere more so than in the national parliament, reports the Guardian’s Madrid correspondent, Sam Jones.

Opposition parties in many countries have declared truces in the face of a national and international health emergency. But in Spain’s 350-seat congress of deputies, there has been neither consensus nor quarter, and the habitual insults and accusations have flown with renewed vigour and venom.

As the pandemic has swept across the country, infecting more than 245,000 people and hobbling the economy, Spaniards have been treated to an even bloodier and more breathless version of the usual Punch and Judy politics.

Updated at 8.16am BST

8.08am BST

In the UK, a new divide is opening up between the “haves” and the “have nots” – this time over Covid-19 testing, reports James Tapper.

While private schools and big businesses have introduced testing for their pupils and employees, allowing them to return to school and work, state schools and small businesses will be left to rely on the state. Campaigners warn that “testing inequality” could fuel greater financial inequality.

Financial giants, such as Credit Suisse, have introduced antibody testing for their employees, while the Premier League restarted its season last week, thanks to rapid antigen testing of players and backroom staff. Ocado bought 100,000 testing kits for its staff when lockdown began and some private schools intend to use testing as part of their plan to get all children back into classrooms at the start of the next academic year.

Antibody testing can show whether or not a person has had Covid-19, whereas antigen testing, also known as PCR, shows whether the person is currently infectious.

Kelly Klifa, co-founder of Testing For All, a not-for-profit organisation which supports wide-scale testing, said: “The majority of the population is left out of these tests. You’ve got the footballers on one end with a multimillion-pound contract. And on the other hand, there are companies that tell their workers, ‘if you have symptoms, you can set yourself up with the NHS’. But realistically, the accessibility of these tests is very difficult.”

Updated at 8.17am BST

7.54am BST

Comedian DL Hughley has announced that he tested positive for Covid-19 after collapsing onstage during a performance in Nashville, Tennessee.

On Saturday, Hughley posted a video on Twitter in which he said he was treated for exhaustion and dehydration afterward fainting at a comedy nightclub on Friday night.

“I also tested positive for COVID-19, which blew me away,” he said. “I was what they call asymptomatic. I didn’t have any symptoms, the classic symptoms.” He added that he will quarantine in his hotel room for two weeks.

Updated at 8.02am BST

7.43am BST

On the front of today’s Observer, psychologists warn UK school closures will trigger a mental health crisis.

7.11am BST

Many UK doctors believe NHS not prepared for second wave

Doctors in the UK are feeling high levels of exhaustion and have little confidence they can manage the huge backlog of missed patient care, Press Association reports.

A survey by the British Medical Association (BMA) of more than 7,000 doctors between June 16 and 18 showed an increase in stress levels among the workforce. Many have little confidence in the NHS’s ability to deal with the large backlog of missed, cancelled and postponed care, the union said.

Some also fear that the health service does not have the capacity to manage a second spike in coronavirus infection levels. There has been a slight increase in the number of doctors experiencing exhaustion and burnout compared with previous results, the BMA said, with 45% saying they are feeling stressed.

Some 32% of those said the pandemic had heightened their stress level, while the other 13% said it was not worse than before. Asked if there had been a change in demand for non-Covid patient care over the last week, 43% said there had been a significant increase and another 21% said it was back to the levels before March.

Half of doctors (50%) surveyed said they were either not very or not at all confident in coping if there was a second spike in Covid-19 infections, while 36% were slightly confident in their ability to cope.

Updated at 7.55am BST

7.07am BST

Several universities have been trying out online graduation ceremonies, to reduce the risk of coronavirus transmission. Here’s a clip of an event in China, from the state-run People’s Daily.

6.52am BST

South Korea reports 48 new coronavirus cases

South Korea has reported 48 new cases of Covid-19 as health authorities struggle to contain a resurgence that’s erasing some of the country’s hard-won gains against the virus, Associated Press reports.

Figures released by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Sunday brought the national caseload to 12,421 confirmed infections including 280 deaths.

It said 24 of the new cases came from the densely populated Seoul metropolitan area, which have been the center of the country’s outbreak since late May.

Ten others were reported from the central city of Daejeon, indicating that the virus was beginning to spread more broadly, apparently as a result of increased public activity and complacency in social distancing.

6.30am BST

The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Germany increased by 687 to 189,822, data from the Robert Koch Institute for infectious diseases showed on Sunday.

The Institute also reported a death toll of 8,882, Reuters reports. On Saturday, the figure stood at 8,883. No explanation was given why the number in Sunday’s tally decreased by one.

6.08am BST

Queensland Health Minister Steven Miles has suggested the state’s borders could remain shut well into next month because of a feared second wave of coronavirus in Victoria, AAP reports.

Miles said the state will be closed until at least 10 July, when the next easing of restrictions is triggered, although the reopening date may even stretch beyond that if Victoria cannot get on top of outbreaks.

Queensland’s borders have been effectively shut since late March. “The last thing we want to do is lift the borders, have lots of people come here for school holidays, spread coronavirus in our state, and then force us to go backwards on restrictions,” Miles said.
“Clearly what’s happening in Victoria will be a matter we will need to take into account in those considerations.”

On Sunday, Victoria recorded another day of double-digit cases while Queensland again had no new positive test with just three active across the state.

LNP opposition leader Deb Frecklington said Queensland businesses have suffered enough and state borders should be opened from 1 July.

She said there is no medical advice calling for border closures and the economy can no longer be suppressed when there are just three active cases across Queensland.
Miles labelled the call to open up borders on July 1 as “reckless”.

5.46am BST

Thailand has reported one new coronavirus case, linked to foreign travel, bringing the total number of infections to 3,148. No new deaths were reported on Sunday. The death toll since the start of the outbreak is 58.

5.30am BST

Diplomatic missions in Myanmar, including the UK, EU and US, have issued a joint statement condemning the internet shut down and media restrictions imposed in areas of the country. It is one year since an internet blackout was imposed across parts of Rakhine and Chin States

“Access to the internet and media is vital for people to obtain and share information for their health” the statement said.

5.15am BST

India has confirmed 15,413 new infections, the biggest one day increase reported since the start of the country’s outbreak. A further 306 deaths have also been confirmed.

5.08am BST

Summary

  • US President Donald Trump told thousands of supporters on Saturday that he had asked officials to slow down testing for Covid-19 because case numbers in the country were rising so rapidly. He also used racist language to describe to Covid-19, referring to the virus as “kung flu”. The country is the worst hit by coronavirus, with more than 119,700 deaths.
  • Mainland China reported 26 new confirmed coronavirus cases on Sunday, driven largely by the latest outbreak of Covid-19 in the capital Beijing.
  • The Philippines reported 578 new cases of coronavirus on Saturday, a record number. This includes test results that were released to patients over the past three days.
  • In Australia, Victoria has extended its state of emergency for another four weeks after case numbers rose to their highest for more than two months.
  • Two new Covid-19 cases have been detected in New Zealand, the Ministry of Health said on Sunday.
  • In Chile, the government nearly doubled its estimated death toll to more than 7,000 on Saturday, after it included probable deaths in its official tally. There have been 236,748 infections in the country so far.
  • Mexico on Saturday reported 4,717 new infections and 387 additional deaths from the coronavirus.
  • Serbians go to polls on Sunday to elect a new parliament in Europe’s first national election since coronavirus lockdowns took effect some three months ago.
  • Globally, 8,769,383 coronavirus cases have now been detected, and 464,029 fatalities confirmed, according to Johns Hopkins University.

4.10am BST

Serbians go to polls on Sunday to elect a new parliament in Europe’s first national election since coronavirus lockdowns took effect some three months ago, with the ruling conservatives seen winning a comfortable majority, Reuters reports.

Polling stations will be equipped with face masks and hand sanitisers for the use of the country’s 5.5 million voters, many of whom are expected to skip voting – partly due to fears of becoming infected.

Turnout could also be hit by the boycott campaign of some opposition parties, who say the vote will not be free or fair due to President Aleksandar Vucic’s firm grip over the media.

According to the latest opinion polls, Vucic’s conservative Serbian Peoples’ Party (SNS) is set to garner about 50% of the vote, boosted by widespread public approval over the government’s handling of the pandemic.

Vucic’s coalition partner, the Socialist Party, is expected to come second with about 10%, while an opposition centre-right party led by Aleksandar Sapic, the mayor of a Belgrade municipality, is tipped to come third.

Vucic himself is not up for re-election, but the opposition parties that are boycotting the poll accuse him of using his position as president to promote his party.

Serbia, which has a population of 7.2 million, has so far reported 12,803 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 260 deaths. It was among the first European countries to start opening its borders on May 22 and all lockdown curbs have since been lifted.

3.49am BST

China reports 26 new coronavirus cases

Mainland China reported 26 new confirmed coronavirus cases on Sunday, driven largely by the latest outbreak of Covid-19 in the Chinese capital, Reuters reports.

Of the new infections, 22 were in Beijing, the National Health Commission said in a statement. The city of more than 20 million people reported its first case in the latest wave on June 11. The resurgence has been linked to a wholesale food centre in the southwest of Beijing. So far, 227 people in the city have been infected in the latest outbreak.

Mainland China reported six new asymptomatic cases, those who are infected with the coronavirus but show no symptoms, down from seven a day earlier. Beijing accounted for three of the new cases. China does not count asymptomatic patients as confirmed cases and as part of the official infection tally.

To date, China has 83,378 confirmed cases.

3.28am BST

New South Wales has recorded five new cases of coronavirus over the last 24 hours, according to Australian Associated Press. All are linked to overseas travel.

Health NSW said that all five new patients were already in hotel quarantine. It takes the state’s coronavirus tally to 3,149, of those 1,836 have been travellers who acquired the virus overseas.

The five positive diagnoses came from 13,643 tests in the 24-hour period up until 8pm Saturday night. “NSW Health would like to thank those with symptoms for coming forward, getting tested and ensuring cases in the community are identified as quickly as possible,” NSW Health said in a statement.

NSW Health said they were treating 54 patients for Covid-19, none of which were in intensive care.

3.14am BST

Two new cases reported in New Zealand

Two new Covid-19 cases have been detected in New Zealand, according to the Ministry of Health. Both cases are linked to overseas travel and were detected within quarantine facilities.

2.43am BST

Trump calls Covid-19 ‘kung flu’ at Tulsa rally

Here is the Guardian’s report on the racist language used by Trump at his Tulsa campaign rally on Saturday evening.

Trump has repeatedly tried to term Covid-19 as the “Chinese virus” or the “Wuhan virus” prompting outrage from many civil liberties groups, who have warned that such language can inspire racism and violence against Asian Americans. But in Tulsa Trump appeared to go even further in his use of racist language.

“It has more names than any disease in history,” Trump said of Covid-19. “I can name kung flu. I can name 19 different versions of names.”

Updated at 9.51am BST

2.37am BST

A White House official has said that Trump’s earlier comment that he told his team to “slow down the testing” was a joke. More than 119,654 people are confirmed to have been killed by Covid-19 in the US, more than in any other country, according to Johns Hopkins University.

2.26am BST

Trump says he told officials to slow down coronavirus testing

Trump is still addressing a campaign rally in Tulsa, where he has used racist language to describe Covid-19 as “Kung Flu”. He has also told crowds that he urged officials to slow down testing in the country because case numbers were climbing so rapidly. The US has the highest number of coronavirus infections and fatalities in the world.

Testing is a double edged sword, he told the rally. “We’ve tested now 25 million people. It’s probably 20 million people more than anybody else…When you do testing to that extent you’re going to find more people, you’re going to find more cases. So I said to my people, slow the testing down please.”

Updated at 5.01am BST

2.07am BST

Summary

The Philippines reported 578 new cases of coronavirus on Saturday, a record number. This includes test results that were released to patients over the past three days, the news website Rappler reports. The country has so far reported 29,400 coronavirus cases, and 1,150 deaths.

Updated at 2.07am BST

1.58am BST

Victoria extends state of emergency

Victoria has extended its state of emergency for another four weeks after recording 19 new Covid-19 cases in the past 24 hours, the state’s health minister Jenny Mikakos has said.

Speaking on Sunday, Mikakos said the government believed 10 of the new cases were believed to be a result of community transmission. Victoria now has 121 active Covid-19 cases in the state.

Mikakos also said members of the Essendon AFL club would have to self-isolate after one player, Connor McKenna, tested positive for Covid-19.

“Essendon football club has announced they have closed for deep cleaning as well [and] of course everyone will be required to be quarantining in the normal manner for that 14 day period,” she said.

The positive case comes just one week after the resumption of the AFL and could affect the club’s ability to continue to play in the competition.

The Victorian government has said the new spike cases in the state have been driven in large part by outbreaks occurring among family groups. The government said on Sunday that police would enforce fines in areas considered to be “hot spots” for the latest outbreak.

“We have had particularly some concerns around family gatherings, extended family members across many households, visiting each other even when they have been exhibiting mild symptoms [and] even going to work when they had mild symptoms,” Mikakos said.

“It is very important when people have symptoms, any symptoms of a cold or flu-type nature, that they take it very seriously because this is a very contagious virus and we are seeing the spread of this virus among extended family members, two grandparents, two grandchildren, children taking us to school, that certainly happened with the Keilor Downs family, with children taking the virus to school, a teacher being infected, and this is how the virus spreads to others in the community.”

Updated at 2.15am BST

1.46am BST

Beijing has reported 22 new Covid-19 cases, according to the state-backed Global Times. After appearing to contain the coronavirus, Chinese officials were forced to raise the emergency response level in the city on 16 June. The spike in cases has been linked to a wholesale market in south-east Beijing.

1.37am BST

Mexico on Saturday reported 4,717 new infections and 387 additional deaths from the coronavirus, Reuters reports, bringing the total number in the country to 175,202 cases and 20,781 deaths. The government has said the real number of infected people is likely significantly higher than the confirmed cases.

1.25am BST

Australian state leaders reconsider plans to open borders

In Australia, state leaders are reconsidering plans to reopen borders after a spike of Covid-19 cases in Victoria.

On Saturday the Victorian premier Daniel Andrews announced that the easing of some restrictions would be delayed after the state saw a spike in cases. Victoria recorded 25 new cases across the state on Saturday, the highest in two months, following rises of 13, 18 and 21 cases over the three days prior. The state now has more than 100 active cases.
“We are absolutely at risk of a second peak,” Victoria’s chief health officer Brett Sutton said on Saturday.

“The danger of not acting now in terms of additional constraints at a household level is that those numbers will get beyond us, get beyond the ability of contact traces to follow everyone.”

In response, a number of states are now reconsidering plans to reopen internal borders which were shut at the height of the pandemic. Neighbouring South Australia is due to reopen on 20 July, but its government is closely monitoring the situation in Victoria and has not ruled out staying closed.

“We will not open our borders to Victoria unless it is safe to do so,” health minister Stephen Wade said on Saturday. “Our number one priority is the health of South Australians.”

Similarly Queensland has declared all of Melbourne’s 31 local government areas Covid-19 hotspots, meaning anyone who travels to the city must self-quarantine for 14 days if they return to Queensland.

Queensland chief health officer Jeannette Young says the hotspots now include all 31 local government areas in greater Melbourne, as well as bordering areas of Murrindindi, Mitchell, Moorabool, Macedon Ranges and Greater Geelong.

From midnight on Sunday, Victorians will only be able to have five people at their homes and gatherings outside the home will be restricted to 10. Cafes, restaurants and pubs were set to expand their number of patrons from 20 to 50 on Monday, but this is now on hold – a blow to ailing businesses desperate for recovery.

On Sunday St Mary’s Catholic school in Melbourne’s south-east said it will temporary close due to at least one positive coronavirus case.

Updated at 1.29am BST

1.22am BST

Trump takes to the stage in Tulsa

In Tulsa, Trump has taken to the stage. He was due on stage at 7pm local time and made it on for 7.12pm, my colleagues in the US report.

There are plenty of empty seats in the upper decks and on the floor of the 19,000-seat Bank of Oklahoma Center. The coronavirus outbreak in the US has killed more than 120,000 people.

Updated at 1.23am BST

1.14am BST

Here is some more detail from Australian Associated Press on the restrictions that are being reimposed in Victoria.

From midnight on Sunday to July 12, Victorians will only be able to have five people at their homes and gatherings outside the home will be restricted to 10.

Cafes, restaurants and pubs were set to expand their number of patrons from 20 to 50 on Monday, but this is now on hold – a blow to ailing businesses desperate for recovery.

Gyms, cinemas, indoor sports centres and concert venues will be allowed to reopen for the first time but with a 20-person limit.

This comes as the state records its highest daily case numbers for more than two months. On Saturday, 25 new cases were recorded across the state, following rises of 13, 18 and 21 cases over the three days prior.

1.09am BST

Queensland broadens quarantine rules

A spike in Covid-19 cases in Melbourne has prompted Queensland’s health department to broaden the number of high-risk areas that force people into mandatory quarantine when returning from Victoria, Australian Associated Press reports.

Queensland Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young says the hotspots now include all 31 Local Government Areas in Greater Melbourne, as well as bordering areas of Murrindindi, Mitchell, Moorabool, Macedon Ranges and Greater Geelong.

The declaration comes as Victoria has recorded several straight days of double-digit cases and now has more than 100 active cases across the state.

Queensland has just three active cases.

Updated at 1.15am BST

1.06am BST

Donald Trump landed in Tulsa for a campaign rally around an hour ago, and is due to speak shortly, at 7pm local time. As my colleagues in the US have pointed out, Trump isn’t known for arriving on time for events. The longer the crowd is left waiting inside the arena, however, the longer they could potentially be exposed to Covid-19.

Catherine Troisi, an infectious disease epidemiologist at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, spoke to CNN earlier about the risks of indoor gatherings during the pandemic. “We know what makes transmission of the virus occur more frequently, and that includes close contact, particularly without masking, crowds, [being] indoors versus outdoors, the duration of the contact, and then shouting also increases the possibility of transmission,” she said.

Updated at 1.06am BST

12.55am BST

More than 8.75 million cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed globally, according to Johns Hopkins University. The US is the worst hit, with 2.25 million infections, followed by Brazil and Russia. On Saturday night, supporters of Donald Trump began to fill a Tulsa stadium where the president will hold a campaign rally, despite warnings form health officials. Just before the event, it was announced that six staff members in Tulsa had tested positive for the coronavirus. The event is expected to be the biggest indoor gathering the country has seen since restrictions to prevent the Covid-19 virus began in March.

Elsewhere, in Chile, the government nearly doubled its estimated death toll to more than 7,000 on Saturday, following criticism of is reporting process. Official data show there have been 236,748 infections in the country so far.

In other developments:

  • Brazil has registered 1,022 new deaths, bringing the country’s total number of known Covid-19 fatalities from 48,954 to 49,976, while infections increased from 1,032,913 on Friday to 1,067,579 on Saturday, a rise of 34,666.
  • In Victoria, Australia’s second most populated state, case numbers are the highest they have been in more than two months, prompting the Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton to warn “We are absolutely at risk of a second peak”. From midnight on Sunday, Victorians will only be able to have five people at their homes and gatherings outside the home will be restricted to 10. Plans to relax rules on the number of people allowed in cafes, restaurants and pubs have also been put on hold.
  • The reproduction rate of coronavirus in Germany has jumped to 1.79, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for public health said on Saturday, far above what is needed to contain the outbreak over the longer term. The rate, published in RKI’s daily situation report, compares with a value of 1.06 on Friday.
  • An Italian collective brought 67 migrants to safety on Saturday, as the first charity rescue ship reached Italian shores since authorities had decided to close all ports because of the coronavirus pandemic in April.
    The Palestinian Authority said on Saturday it was temporarily closing the cities of Hebron and Nablus in the occupied West Bank to contain the spread of coronavirus after a sharp rise in infections.
  • Spain’s foreign minister Arancha Gonzalez has said that British tourists can visit the country from Sunday without facing quarantine.
  • As the number of coronavirus cases in Israel keeps growing since a number of lockdown measures have been eased, prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu is considering allowing the Shin Bet secret service to track confirmed and suspected cases.
  • Iran is considering making it mandatory within days to wear masks in public places and covered spaces, president Hassan Rouhani said on Saturday, as the tally of confirmed coronavirus cases continued to rise above 200,000.
  • Greece has announced another extension of the coronavirus lockdown on its migrant camps, hours after 2,000 people protested in central Athens to mark World Refugee Day and denounce the government’s treatment of migrants.
  • Portuguese prosecutors said on Saturday they had launched an investigation into a birthday party attended by scores of people in the town of Lagos on 7 June, which could have led to many new coronavirus infections.
  • If you have contributions for the coronavirus global live blog please do email me rebecca.ratcliffe@theguardian.com, or I’m @rebeccarat on Twitter.
  • Updated at 1.26am BST

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