Pale, male and posh: the media is still in a class of its own

Some 51% of leading journalists and 80% of editors are privately educated. It’s time to move on

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
The Guardian view on bombing Syria: a decision for parliament

Theresa May has decided to break with parliamentary convention and not seek approval from MPs for military action. This is a mistake

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
The Guardian view on the BBC: we should cherish and defend it

The BBC has myriad faults, and frequently stumbles in its aim for impartiality. But it represents a valuable and increasingly fragile public space. And for that it must be treasured

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
A revolution in our sense of self

In a radical reassessment of how the mind works, a leading behavioural scientist argues the idea of a deep inner life is an illusion. This is cause for celebration, he says, not despair

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Mohamed’s life story is a tragedy. But it’s typical for fathers held on Manus

The stories of these fathers is a window into the lives of men who feel they are nothing more than forgotten people

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
The Guardian view on free speech online: let law decide the limits

The standards by which the internet is controlled need to be open and subject to impartial judiciaries – not left to advertisers

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
“The young officers are wanted…”

Dr. Kamlesh Chandigarh: “The young officers are wanted…” This comment of Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Enemies, traitors, saboteurs: how can we face the future with this anger in our politics?

The language we use in public and on social media has repercussions. The first step must greater civility

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Should we rage against death, or enjoy the charmed spaces of life?

An Ingmar Bergman classic is a reminder not just of the inevitable but of the small happinesses we should all treasure

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
My great-great-aunt was a terrorist: women’s politics went beyond the vote

Pritilata Waddedar fought the British in 1930s Bengal. Her actions reveal the diversity behind the suffrage story

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
UA-77396268-1
%d bloggers like this: